Land Line
November, 1999

How to Keep Your Wheels Rolling Strong

Regardless of how "cutting edge" your wheels are, you'll still need to keep an eye on them for signs of damage.  An ignored crack between tow bolt holes, for example, can turn into a dangerous and potentially fatal accident.  Regular upkeep can eliminate larger problems before they occur. 

Gunite Corporation, has developed the following set of guidelines to watch for when conducting wheel and hub inspections:

FOREIGN MATTER ON/AROUND HUBS
Corrosion can not only hinder hub support, it can also be a signal to more serious problems within wheel end assembly.  Use a wire brush to clean the hub's machined surfaces, stud threads and ball seats.

WORN STUD HOLES
Caused by studs turning in their respective holes, this condition is caused by insufficient torque on the back nut.  The hub needs to be replaced.

WORN OR DAMAGED MOUNTING FACE
A loose wheel assembly or an improperly installed outboard mounted drum is the culprit.  This also calls for hub replacement.  To avoid this problem, follow proper torquing procedures.

BENT HUB FACE
When wheels run loose for an extended period, the hub face is inevitable damaged.  A common symptom is wheel nuts that are constantly in need of re-tightening.  The only solution to this problem is replacement.

CRACKED WHEELS
Cracks that run between bolt holes, hand holes, or center holes can be extremely dangerous.  This is often caused by loose wheel nuts, improper torque, damaged hub mounting surface, loose/broken studs or a worn stud groove.  A cracked wheel is a dangerous wheel, and must be replaced.

RUST STREAKS
Loose cap nuts are a common cause of this condition.  The entire assembly should be checked for damage if you notice the appearance of these streaks from the bolt holes.

SEIZED, BROKEN, OR CRACKED FLANGE NUTS
Corrosion, excessive torque, and insufficient nut strength are some of the reasons why a nut may fail.  When a nut is added, be certain to lubricate it properly and follow proper torquing procedures.

BROKEN STUDS
Often the result of loose cap nuts or overloading, it requires the replacement of BOTH the broken stud and the stud on either side of it.  If more than one broken stud is found, they should all be replaced.

STRIPPED THREADS
Excessive torque will strip the threads on your studs.  When replacing the stripped stud, make certain to follow the recommended torquing procedures.